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45 Coyotes Take Permanent Dirt Naps in Thermal Scope Footage

Coyote
YouTube: Ultimate Night Vision

Coyotes have nowhere to hide from a quality thermal optic.

When most people think of night hunting with thermal optics, they probably think of hog hunting. No doubt about it, thermals are a highly efficient way of controlling feral swine populations, but they work well for predator control too.

In this awesome scope cam footage out of Texas, 45 coyotes end up taking permanent dirt naps thanks to a quality thermal scope and some fine shooting.

If you enjoy predator hunting, you are going to get a kick out of this video. It is eleven minutes of non-stop coyote hunting action.  There are even a few bonus hog kills thrown in for good measure.

Just like feral hogs, coyote populations need to be kept in check. Fortunately, these animals do not root up farmer's fields like hogs do, but they do attack and kill livestock on a regular basis. They can also hinder native wildlife populations by preying on turkeys, deer and more.

More disturbingly, in some urban areas coyote populations have begun to take foothold. In some cases the animals are losing their fear of humans and attacks are on the rise. Hunting them like this helps to keep that natural fear ingrained for the ones that slip away. The hunters in this video did an excellent job of putting a nice dent in the population for now.

While coyotes are becoming an increasing problem in many areas, we are fortunate that the problem is not nearly as bad as the one faced with feral hogs, which breed like rabbits. Coyotes are a relatively easy problem to deal with by comparison!

We do have to admire the amazing detail offered by today's thermal scope offerings. You can literally see the individual hairs on these coyotes' bodies.

Excellent shooting fellas and thanks for helping keep the population in check!

NEXT: THE AXIS DEER AND HOW THEY'RE IMPACTING PARTS OF THE UNITED STATES

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45 Coyotes Take Permanent Dirt Naps in Thermal Scope Footage