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Farmer Takes Out 107 Feral Hogs in Texas Using Thermal Night Vision

Thermal Night Vision
YouTube: Ultimate Night Vision

Feral hogs have completely devastated Texas farms and the problem is only getting worse, so it's time to turn to thermal night vision.

If you aren't a fan of squealing hogs, I simply advise you to move past this video. If you like to see hogs hit the dirt, well...you're in the right place. Because this video has a lot of that. In fact, 107 hogs take permanent dirt naps here in this amazing compilation out of Texas.

Thermal night vision is changing the game, and these Texas farmers are putting it to good use to help save their land from the pesky feral hog population. Like dominoes, pigs begin to drop left and right.

It's pretty crazy to think that even taking out this many hogs still doesn't put a dent in the spiraling hog population in the Lone Star State.

If this seems extreme, must remember that these critters uproot entire farmer's fields in a single night if the sounder is large enough. They also sometimes kill fawns and munch on the eggs of native wildlife like turkeys. To put it simply, these animals simply do not belong here and the long-lasting side effects are something Texans will likely be dealing with for generations to come. The only way to keep the problem from becoming worse is extreme population control measures like what you just witnessed here.

Other than night hunting, the other most popular way to deal with feral hog problems in Texas is probably helicopter hunting, which gives the swine no place to hide and allows hunters to take out entire sounders before they can become wide spread.

Just think of all the crops saved, all the future devastation prevented and all the bacon they're left with. Bacon bits, bacon sundaes, plates of bacon and bacon sandwiches...sign me up!

NEXT: GRAPHIC: YOU WON'T BELIEVE WHAT KIND OF GUN RESULTED IN THIS HUNTING ACCIDENT

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Farmer Takes Out 107 Feral Hogs in Texas Using Thermal Night Vision