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Giant Deer Remains Discovered By Beachgoers on Isle of Man

Isle of Man giant deer

These giant deer remains were discovered on a beach on the Isle of Man. 

When archaeologists caught wind that possible bones from an extinct giant deer lay beneath the surface of strata at the beach they didn't hesitate. Luckily, people walking on the Kirk Michael shoreline spotted the bones and reported the rare discovery. Wind and rain eventually eroded the rock enough exposing the buried bones.

The deer boasts antlers approximately six and half feet wide. Almost the same size as your modern day moose if not bigger. Similar displays of the deer bones were discovered in 1897 and are now on display at the Manx Museum. That deer contained an antler span of eight and half and was found on St. Johns.

It's not every day that you stumble across the skeleton of a 10,000-year-old giant deer! 🦌💀

It's not every day that you stumble across the skeleton of a 10,000-year-old giant deer! 🦌💀

Posted by BBC Isle of Man on Monday, March 19, 2018

The giant deer is commonly referred to as an Irish elk. Likewise, they typically stood seven feet tall and contain antler spans of 14 feet wide.

The giant deer or Megaloceros giganteus lived across Europe, North Africa and Asia. However, the deer is thought to have gone extinct over 7,000 year ago. Several parts of remains were found in Ireland, however, archaeologist Andy Johnson said, "It's the first time I've seen such a complete set of remains in the ground."

Manx National Heritage natural history curator, Laura McCoy, said "We were also conscious that a find like this might quickly attract souvenir hunters."

Like what you see here? Read more awesome hunting articles by Nathan Unger at the Bulldawg Outdoors blog. Follow him on Twitter @Bulldawgoutdoor, Instagram @Bulldawgoutdoors and subscribe on YouTube @Bulldawgoutdoors.

NEXT: HERE'S THE GRAPHIC ARCHERY MOOSE HUNT THAT BECAME AN INSTANT CLASSIC

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Giant Deer Remains Discovered By Beachgoers on Isle of Man