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10 of My Favorite Vintage Revolver Photographs

How would you like a little vintage revolver eye candy? Here are 10 drool-worthy photos showing old revolvers as still-life works of art.

There are a ton of great vintage revolver photos on the Internet. Here are 10 of my personal favorites, in no particular order.

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Colt Walker

The Colt Walker (or Walker Colt) was a single-action black powder revolver that fired .44 caliber lead balls. It was a short-lived though popular and powerful gun that was the result of a collaboration between Texas Ranger Captain Samuel Hamilton Walker Samuel Colt. This gun was featured in the film “The Outlaw Josey Wales” (adeptly handled by Clint Eastwood’s title character… one of two Eastwood guns on this list).

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Smith & Wesson 29

When the S&W Model 29 was released by the company, it was the most powerful production handgun in existence. It also came in a number of barrel lengths. The longer-barreled Model 29 is famous as the iconic handgun wielded by Clint Eastwood’s “Dirty Harry” Callahan character. The particular model in this photo shows a lovely well-used patina.

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This image is an amalgam of different firearms, and we’re not certain what makes they all are. But it’s a very cool image and the revolvers play a most prominent role. I love the composition and vibe of this photo. This would be the arsenal of any self-respecting frontiersman. It just makes me want to head to the range!

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Colt Peacemaker

The clean lines and aesthetic qualities of the Colt Single Action Army revolver guarantee that just about any image of the gun is an iconic one. There’s a reason that the Peacemaker earned the title as “The gun that won the West.” Beautiful.

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Teddy Roosevelt’s Smith & Wesson Model 3

The note attached to this image reads as follows: “This revolver is attributed by Smith & Wesson factory records to future U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt. He most likely took delivery of this gun just prior to training his Rough Riders at San Antonio, Texas. This gun features ‘combat target’ sights and is one of only three or four known to have been chambered for the .38 U.S. Service caliber cartridge (.38 Colt).” A gorgeous vintage revolver and a fine tribute to our 26th President.

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Colt Python

The Python is one of the most badass handguns in history. Every handgun enthusiast wants one, and if they have one they want another one. The Colt Python is indeed the Rolls Royce of handguns. Why else would zombie killer Rick Grimes (of The Walking Dead television show fame) carry one? It has to be for visual effect alone if nothing else.

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Smith & Wesson Schofield Revolver

The Smith & Wesson top-break or top-loading revolver looks stunning in this image. This is also one of those handguns that underwent a number of modifications during its production life. It’s a popular reproduction model today, of which the one pictured here may be. There’s just something old school and romantic about a top-break vintage revolver.

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Smith & Wesson Model 1917

M1917 revolvers saw duty from World War I all the way into the Vietnam War. They became popular handguns for civilian and police use. Colt also made a variation of the S&W M1917. This photo speaks to the history, simplicity and reliability of the gun.

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Colt Dragoon

A slightly later variation on the Colt Walker, this gun became extremely popular during and after the Civil War. It was carried by fictional character Augustus McCrae in the novel and miniseries “Lonesome Dove,” as well as by the Mattie Ross character in the book and 2010 film “True Grit.” The Sheriff’s badge in this picture reminds me of both Sheriff Rooster Cogburn and former Texas Ranger Gus McCrae characters in those two iconic films.

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Smith & Wesson Model 10 .38 Special

The super popular “.38 Special” S&W Model 10 underwent numerous changes during the lifetime of its production, most of them cosmetic. This image reminds of its use as a police or detective favorite back in the day, and the grips just scream “vintage revolver.”

The note attached to this image comes from John Black: “My Dad’s Smith & Wesson .38 Special he bought in the 1950’s and had the work done on it in the early 1960’s, [now] owned by John Black.”

Like what you see here? You can read more great articles by David Smith at his facebook page, Stumpjack Outdoors.

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10 of My Favorite Vintage Revolver Photographs