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Why this Gutting Blade Works So Well

You’ll see the gutting blade in a new light after checking out the Outdoor Edge collection.

American hunters have used traditional gut hooks on their skinning knives for decades, while European hunters have preferred an upside down gutting blade with a blunt tip to zip open their game.

We have found the curved banana shaped gutting blade offered on several Outdoor Edge knives to be the best of both worlds, and the most effective for opening game like a zipper.

three-gutting-blades

This Outdoor Edge specifically designed gutting blade slides under the skin so no hair is cut. The result is a clean, straight, hairless cut through the hide.

A traditional gut hook cuts at the skin level, which ends up slicing through plenty of hair that ends up on your fresh meat.

Another shortcoming with traditional gut hooks is that they tend to fill with hair and clog rather easy because the cutting area inside the hook is so small. The long and open cutting edge on this blade can’t fill with hair or clog, period.

Since the gut blade does all the slicing through the hide, your main skinning blade gets used much less. The result is longer edge retention for your skinning blade because the second gutting blade does half the work.

swingblaze_razorpro-2

 

If you have never used this style of gutting blade, you owe it to yourself to try one. Check out the SwingBlade and Razor-Pro from Outdoor Edge at your local dealer and see them in use on big game in both the SwingBlade and Razor-Lite videos.

NEXT: HEAR WHY THE SWINGBLADE IS GOING TO CHANGE WHAT YOU KNOW ABOUT YOUR KNIFE

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Why this Gutting Blade Works So Well