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Molten Aluminum Poured Into Fire Ant Colony Reveals Nest's Inner Structure

Fire Ant Colony
YouTube: Anthill Art

That is one way to deal with the ant problem!

There are plenty of small, crawly creatures that people do not like to find in their yard. One of the worst is the red imported fire ant. This species is originally native to South America but has come to live all over the United States.

That makes them an invasive species and an annoying one at that. As anyone who has ever stepped on a hill of them accidentally can attest. The sting of these insects causes an extremely unpleasant burning and can be dangerous if you are unlucky enough to be allergic.

Which is why we do not feel too badly watching this guy pour molten aluminum down a problem ant hill. Believe it or not, he has a good reason to do this too. Watch as he then digs up the nest and cleans it off to make a unique piece of art.

The presence of fire ants is often an unpleasant surprise. Many people do not realize they are in their home or yard until the stinging starts. In this case, the ants were on the receiving end of the surprise. As weird as it was to see someone do this, the cleaned-up aluminum cast is fascinating to look at. In case you ever wondered how elaborate a fire ant colony was, there is your answer.

Watching the dirt get washed away to reveal the elaborate inner workings of the nest was amazingly satisfying to watch. Especially the delicate portions near the bottom.

According to the video's description, this cast colony is about 18 inches high and weighs 17.9 pounds. That is a serious amount of tunneling these ants were doing beneath the surface of the earth. As large as the hill was, we never would have guessed there was that much structure to it underground.

For more outdoor content from Travis Smola, be sure to follow him on Twitter and check out his Geocaching and Outdoors with Travis YouTube channels

NEXT: THE AXIS DEER AND HOW THEY'RE IMPACTING PARTS OF THE UNITED STATES

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Molten Aluminum Poured Into Fire Ant Colony Reveals Nest's Inner Structure