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Tiny House Suburbs Could Be Colorado’s Next Big Thing

Lifehack

Ever since the tiny house movement exploded onto the interior designer scene, we’ve seen just about every reincarnation. Except this.

Colorado draws more and more visitors to its lands every year, capitalizing on its beautiful mountainscapes that offer excitement no matter the season. However, as the population explodes, as it has over the course of the last three years, the consistent problem seems to be how to accommodate that growth without disrupting the natural landscape.

Ron Stambaugh, founder of Sprout Tiny Homes, sees a solution to that problem. He has consistently tried to reinvent the house in itself, and moving his sights toward a grander idea, he has settled on the potential that an entire tiny home subdivision would offer in mountain towns specifically.

The tiny homes would be available to those who work in the mountain towns who often face the struggle of finding an affordable place to live. This is a struggle that has only increased since the population growth, and one that is also a huge problem in other tourist-based and rural areas across the country.

Lifehack
Lifehack

Mountain communities are booming, especially with the population growth, and people from around the country flock to the winter playground every year to either participate or spend a season working the slopes for cash. That’s not even including local residents who have seen their homes demolished by the building of resort hotels or other mountain communities that are way too expensive to afford.

This comes on the heels of Vail Resorts in Breckenridge announced that workers living in employee housing units could have to start living two per room, which is a result of the growing wanderlust many dreamily associate with the mountains of beautiful Colorado.

Inspiration de/Upsplash
Inspiration de/Upsplash

However, in order to create tiny houses, Colorado communities would have to lift the ban on a zoning code statewide that prohibits buildings smaller than 600 square feet. This is easier said than done, however, as many associate tiny homes as being no different from a few trailer parks that position themselves along I-70 near the entrance to the ski havens.

Stambaugh, however, believes that his idea is different and aesthetically, will add to the mountainscape and blend seamlessly into it, as opposed to jutting out from it with distractions. Whether this change will occur sooner rather than later, he stands by the fact that there are so many more benefits outweighing the negatives behind the tiny house suburb.

NEXT: An Empty Shed Turns into Wilderness Oasis in This Great Renovation

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Tiny House Suburbs Could Be Colorado’s Next Big Thing