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This Smallmouth Could Potentially Break Michigan’s 100-Year-Old Record [PICS]

Pictures via Michigan Sportsman

This smallmouth caught in Michigan’s Lake Hubbard could break a century-old state record.

A recent catch from a tournament in Northeastern Michigan is creating quite a stir as the angler awaits confirmation from the Department of Natural Resources of a new state record smallmouth bass.

Michigan’s current record smallmouth is nine pounds, four ounces, caught in 1906 by W.F. Shoemaker from Long Lake in Cheboygan County.

Tournament angler Greg Gasiciel caught the new potential record on a grub while fishing Hubbard Lake on Oct. 18, 2015. The fish was weighed on certified scales at 9.32 pounds; pending approval of the Michigan DNR, he may have eclipsed a record that has stood in place for more than 100 years.

The potential record breaking smallmouth tapes out over two feet long.

SmallieRecordTapedWOS

Michigan, the land of ten thousand lakes, is a world-class smallmouth bass fishery and angling paradise. Many of its largest smallmouth are found in the northern parts of the state, according to a 2011 article by Eric Sharp of The Detroit Free Press.

Over the course of five years, 12 smallmouth bass that weighed six pounds or more were caught on Lake St. Clair and qualified for Master Angler Awards. During that same period, Burt Lake produced six smallmouths that heavy.

The lake is also one among several in Michigan that made the cut of Bassmaster Magazine’s top 100 bass lakes in the United States.

In the video below, Jonathon VanDam gives up some of his favorite lakes, while discreetly explaining that some areas he’s a little more guarded with due to the fact they might contain a potential world record.

So, when are you headed north for your own potential world record?

Share your catches with us on Instagram at @wospaces!

Pictures via Michigan Sportsman

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This Smallmouth Could Potentially Break Michigan’s 100-Year-Old Record [PICS]