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Shotgun Shooting: Dealing with the Short Stock, Part 2

ftd-shotgusize
Photo by Dale Tate

If your short stock is effecting your shooting, there are several remedies to address the problem.

In Part 1 of this article we looked at how to add length to a short stock. From expensive and elaborate to free and simplistic, there are ways to improve your shooting by making the gun fit.

Photo by Dale Tate
Photo by Dale Tate

 

The most expensive option to fix a short stock is to replace it. The effect on the gun’s value must be considered when contemplating this option. A new stock can cost well into the four-digit price range.

First, you must determine if the stock will cost more than the entire gun is worth. If the shotgun is relatively valuable or collectable, you have to evaluate whether a replacement stock will detract from the value.

If you are uncertain about the extent of restoration, repair and investment you want to make, I offer you a completely different approach. You can make the shotgun behave as if the stock was longer and you can learn to hit targets consistently using it.

Photo by Toni Riekers
Photo by Toni Riekers

 

Hand placement on the fore-end can make the shotgun respond as if it were longer. Specifically, the greater the distance between your hands, the longer the stock will seem to be.

Grab It

 

Many shotgunners insist on holding the fore-end stock with their weak hand. The fore-end really isn’t a handle, it is just a latch to keep the barrels from falling off. Don’t be intimidated by holding the barrels with your off hand. If your shooting is voluminous and barrel heat becomes a problem, you can utilize a slip-on hand guard or glove.

As you extend your hand further towards the muzzle, the stock will become increasingly difficult to get into your shoulder. The gun starts to behave as if the stock is longer. When you determine the proper space between your hands that allows for proper gun mounting, you can finalize fitting the gun to you.

Many short stocked shotguns are offered at a reduced price compared to a standard length twin. If you know how to evaluate the best options to lengthen the stock, it is easy to estimate what it will cost to make the length usable by you. Frequently, the price reduction on a short stocked gun is substantial enough to keep it a bargain even after investing in stock lengthening.

There are many options available to lengthen a short stocked gun. Having some knowledge of these options and being capable of assessing the return on investment will make your decisions much easier. Having and existing relationship with a great wood craftsman is also a good idea.

A short stock should not be considered a problem but merely a situation that can be corrected.

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Shotgun Shooting: Dealing with the Short Stock, Part 2