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Potential Assault Weapons Ban Looms Over Michigan

ar-15 assault weapon

In an attempt to reduce gun violence, Michigan Democrats have introduced a bill that targets “assault weapons.”

On Wednesday, October 19th, Michigan Democrats introduced a package of bills with the intent to reduce gun violence, one of which specifically targets “assault weapons.” The bills were introduced by Robert Wittenberg of Oak Park and Jim Townsend of Royal Oak.

The proposed law would prohibit and impose penalties for the purchase, manufacture or possession of what the bill deems an assault weapon. Currently in its draft form, an “assault weapon” is defined as:

A semiautomatic pistol or semiautomatic or pump-action rifle capable of accepting a detachable magazine, that has at least one feature including a pistol grip behind the trigger on a rifle, a shoulder stock on a pistol, a barrel shroud, a muzzle break or compensator, or a protruding grip not held by the trigger hand.

As firearm owners, such a broad description should be of concern to all of us.

Can you imagine if this bill passed and set the precedent for an assault weapon? Technically, this Airsoft gun would be considered an “assault weapon.”

Included in this bill is a limitation on the amount of ammunition your firearm can hold. The bill would make it illegal to posses a firearm that has a detachable magazine that can hold more than 10 rounds. This includes pistols, and semiautomatic and pump-action rifles. To top it off, a person in violation of this proposed bill would face felony charges punishable by four years in prison and a $2,100 fine.

Fortunately, this bill is facing opposition already. Members of the Michigan Gun Rights group are speaking out against this bill. According to mlive, Mike Warren, a member who lives in Kalamazoo, stated that he oppposed the bill “because he believes it would impact law-abiding gun owners more than criminals.”

“It’s like a solution looking for a problem,” said Warren.

As a Michigan resident, I have to agree.

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Potential Assault Weapons Ban Looms Over Michigan