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Pennsylvania Law Could Protect Hunters from PETA Drone Surveillance

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Pennsylvania lawmakers are pushing for legislation to ban PETA drones from surveilling hunters and anglers.

Imagine that you’re out hunting or fishing and a drone flies by to record what you’re doing.

While it might sound far-fetched, that’s exactly what PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) is doing right now. The animal-rights organization sells a line of aerial drones called the “Sky Angels”, which are designed to monitor hunters and anglers for poaching and animal cruelty on public lands.

“The idea is that poachers need to rethink the idea that they can get away with murder out there alone in the woods with no one watching,” PETA representative Ashley Byrne told the Pennsylvania Independent. 

RELATED: Click here to see a video of the PETA drones in action.

Illinois has already passed a laws to stop the PETA drones and similar craft from interfering with hunters. Pennsylvania is gearing up to be the next state to tackle the issue.

State Senator Richard Kasunic recently introduced a pair of bills that, if passed, would would ban aerial drones from interfering with hunters and anglers.

Kasunic and others in the Illinois Senate the drones as a matter of hunter interference and a violation of privacy.

“Most Americans don’t want drones spying on us or watching our activities for any reason, particularly if they’re not criminal,” said State Sen. Richard Alloway.

But regulatory measures for hunting drones might already be taken care of in the Keystone State. Pennsylvania Game Commission spokesman Travis Lau said that the state’s hunter interference laws may already cover aerial drones.

“As a point of clarity, and drones being a big issue, maybe it’s better to clean up that language and address it specifically,” said Lau.

Whatever the state decides, one thing is clear: aerial drone technology is becoming more commonplace in all areas of life, even in the hunting and fishing worlds. For example, earlier this year a Minnesota beer maker was gearing up to use aerial drones to deliver cases of beer to ice fishermen on remote frozen lakes, but was later shut down by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Drones may very well have a big impact on hunters and anglers in the coming years – and everyone else for that matter.

What do you think about the PETA drones? How do you think drones should be regulated when it comes to hunting and fishing? Share your thoughts in the comments section. 

 

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Pennsylvania Law Could Protect Hunters from PETA Drone Surveillance