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Ontario Angler Catches Possible World Record Walleye on Bay of Quinte

Image: Outdoor Life

An ice fisherman caught a possible world record walleye earlier this winter on Lake Ontario’s Bay of Quinte.

Outdoor Life reported that angler Grant McAllister bagged the record walleye on the afternoon of Jan. 9. The impressive fish weighed 14.1 pounds and measured 35.3 inches long, which is more than an inch longer than the current world record.

The record walleye is currently pending verification by the Fresh Water Fishing Hall of Fame for the catch and release walleye ice fishing world record. Over the next few weeks, the organization will examine notarized statements from witnesses to verify the world record walleye. The current world record is a tie split between anglers Jay Millar and Jay Manwell, who both caught 34-inch-long walleyes.

McAllister is no stranger to trophy walleye catches. He runs a fishing guide company on the Bay of Quinte, and has been chasing world record walleye for the past five years.

“My personal best to date was 14-pounds 7-ounces and 33.25 inches, but just by looking at this one I knew she was bigger,” McAllister told Outdoor Life.

RELATED: Ice fisherman catches possible world record brown trout on the Milwaukee Harbor [VIDEO]

Prior to becoming a fishing guide, McAllister owned an insurance brokerage firm in Toronto. In 2008, he made the transition to becoming a pro fishing guide on the Bay of Quinte, where he fishes 200-250 days a year.

“Since, I’ve made it my life mission to find and catch big walleyes,” McAllister told Outdoor Life.

McAllister caught the record walleye using a spoon lure tipped with a full minnow. To find the fish, he used a Marcum LX9 sonar camera system. McAllister described his technique in this excerpt from the Outdoor Life article:

“The Marcum LX-9 allows me to get within a 1/4 inch target ID separation, so I put the spoon right on top of the walleye’s head, and slowly bring the fish higher and higher off the bottom, sometimes six, seven, eight, nine feet before they strike. I’m just shaking that spoons trying to get wiggle out of the minnow. Once you get it in your sights or on your zoom, those fish are going after the minnow and absolutely crush the bait.”

 What’s the biggest walleye you’ve caught? Let us know in the comments section below?

 

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Ontario Angler Catches Possible World Record Walleye on Bay of Quinte