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The One Turkey Hunting Trick You’d Never Think Would Work, But Always Does

Find out the one turkey hunting trick to stash away in your strategies.

You’ve read up on all the tried and true techniques that turkey hunters swear by. You’ve scouted the area you’ll be hunting ahead of time, found roosts, detected strut zones, and placed eyeballs on the best places to set up and call them in.

But, lo and behold, the big tom you’ve picked out of the flock from a distance isn’t moving anymore, and has planted his feet. This is where an unorthodox, aggressive, against-the-grain idea can come in handy. It may not work every time, but the percentages say this move is the best way to get after a turkey that’s stuck in his spot, out in the open.

Sometimes referred to as “reaping” or “jumping,” the tactic doesn’t seem to square up with the traditional way of doing things.

Photograph of several beautiful wild turkeys in a spring meadow in the Appalachian mountains.
Photograph of several beautiful wild turkeys in a spring meadow in the Appalachian mountains.

The only thing needed, in addition to a good turkey gun, is a strutter decoy. Even just a gobbler fan can work, but having something lightweight that you can stake in the ground is best. You want the tom to see you coming, and understand that you mean business.

The mobile move involves heading straight for the flock, specifically the turkey you’ve pinpointed. Crouch behind the decoy as much as possible, but be deliberate and move faster than you think would be necessary. Pause every 15 or so steps, turn the decoy to the left or right to give the gobbler a profile view, and turn back to face him while moving again in his direction.

Once you’ve closed to 80 yards or less, stake the decoy and be ready, because the odds say the most aggressive toms won’t tolerate an intruder and head towards the decoy to defend his turf. And when we say be ready, we mean it. They’re likely to close the gap quickly. Turkeys can actually run up to 25 miles an hour, and if all works out, you’ll have a blood-pumping, point blank shot nearly fall into your lap.

You can trust that when your target turkeys are hung up in the open fields, you’ve at least got one back pocket move that will almost certainly prove to you that turkey hunting is indeed as good as it gets. See more reasons why inCabela’s Turkey Roost, where you’ll find more tactics like these, and plenty else.

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The One Turkey Hunting Trick You’d Never Think Would Work, But Always Does