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Mother’s Day Moment: Will a Whitetail Doe Accept a Foster Fawn as Its Own?

Mother’s Day is on the way, and this whitetail doe has lost her own fawn. Will she accept a strange fawn as her own?

It’s spring again, and that means lots of new wild babies. If you find a baby animal you think might be lost or abandoned, walk away. Wild animals often leave their offspring for long periods to feed or find food for their young. You should leave sick or injured animals alone and call an animal control officer.

Professional wildlife biologists and animal care specialists usually take on foster care duty. However, even a doe who lost her own baby shows a mother’s love does not transcend nature.

The way life in the wild kingdom works is sometimes foreign to humans. Who better than a whitetail doe to succeed at fostering an orphaned fawn?

I loved to see the deer vocalize, stomp, raise her “radar dish” ears, and blow until the cows come home. Anyone who has spent some time in a tree watching the woods and listening will know there’s nothing better than a healthy deer herd. Such a herd includes whitetails with keen senses and survival abilities taught by their mothers.

All these things gained by a life raised in the wild by one of the best teachers in nature: Mom.

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NEXT: REAGAN’S STORY: AN 11-YEAR-OLD FALLS IN LOVE WITH BOWHUNTING

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Mother’s Day Moment: Will a Whitetail Doe Accept a Foster Fawn as Its Own?