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Make an Arrowhead from an Antique Fruit Jar

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Shawn Woods takes a broken antique canning or fruit jar and turns it into a gorgeous arrowhead. Scouring a dump site yields legitimate treasures!

Continuing his effort to make something utilitarian from “dump site” finds, Shawn Woods takes the bottom of an antique canning jar and turns it into a brilliantly beautiful arrowhead.

Woods last used a chunk of a broken toilet – john-stone – to knap an arrowhead and a large spear point. He’s moved from the bathroom to the kitchen, you might say, with this interesting find of a broken fruit jar. It’s perfect for knapping an arrowhead that can take down a deer or an elk.

Woods states that he really likes knapping old jars like this because the bottoms are lens shaped. That is, they have two convex sides, making for a thick piece of glass ideal for flintknapping.

He starts by removing the protruding edges of the jar wall, using a small antler bopper. Light hits are all it takes. But he is extra careful about not splitting the bottom of the glass.

Next, once he has only the round bottom of the glass, he begins using the bopper to drive flakes of glass from each side of the piece, creating a more or less uniform, bifaced piece of glass. Woods constantly turns the glass in his hands as he hammers flakes from the sides, roughing the edge up with a stone when necessary.

Once he has the piece shaped the way he wants it, he begins to pressure flake the edge of the glass with an antler tine pressure flaker. After a while the piece truly looks like an arrowhead. All that’s left to do is add the side nocks for attaching the point to an arrow shaft, which he does with a more refined pressure flaker made from a horseshoe nail embedded into a piece of wood.

Finally, he rounds out the base of the arrowhead, and he’s finished.

“And now we have completed a blue glass arrowhead made out of an antique canning jar,” he concludes.

Like what you see here? You can read more great articles by David Smith at his Facebook page, Stumpjack Outdoors.

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NEXT: The Making of an Ishi Style Glass Bottle Knife

Make an Arrowhead from an Antique Fruit Jar