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Knifing Winds and Brutal Cold Create Dramatic Bighorn Sheep Hunt

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How much would you endure to hunt massive bighorn sheep? Two weeks of -25 degrees and cutting winds? This weather looks as brutal as it can get.

The weather conditions in this teaser appear about as harsh as harsh can be. But the Cadomin rams are huge, and bowhunter Archie Nesbitt is determined to get a record ram.

The frigid conditions of Alberta, Canada tested Nesbitt and his crew, and even though sheep appeared plentiful and even cooperative, it took two weeks of hard hunting for them to get the quality ram they were after.

The trailer is from season one, episodes 20 and 21 of The Ultimate Shot, a hunting adventure program that takes the viewer around the world with Nesbitt as he pursues big game in a variety of environments and conditions.

Nesbitt indicated that they endured “temperatures of down to 45 degrees below zero, with hurricane winds that would blow you of the mountain, we climbed to the top each [and] every day during the course of 15 days” in search of “the biggest and potentially world record Cadomin Big Horn Ram.”

While the introduction and music to the episode may seem a bit too theatrical for some, there’s no question that the hunt itself demanded a high level of physical and mental toughness.

Interestingly, one of the rams that Nesbitt shot was also subsequently shot by a hunter with a firearm before Nesbitt could claim it, thereby making it ineligible for record book consideration. You can watch the two episodes – numbers 20 and 21 of season one – in their entirety on The Ultimate Shot’s Vimeo page as well as on youtube.

While Nesbitt is indeed a trophy hunter, he also makes a claim of being strongly conservation-minded. Of his hunting pursuits he says,

“I believe it is about opening up the world’s eyes to inform them about conservation and preservation of the World’s hunted wildlife, and the forever sustained use and protection of that wildlife.

It is about creating a value in that wildlife renewable resource for the local peoples, so that they protect and preserve that wildlife resource and helping fellow bow hunters and conservationists experience the wildlife resources of the world, with the local/traditional hunters of that wildlife.

By doing that, we sustain that value and create the future value for the local people so that for generations – hopefully forever – these animals and their habitat will be protected and preserved… that is what I have been doing since 1980.”

NEXT: New World Record Bighorn Ram Found After Being Hit by Car

Knifing Winds and Brutal Cold Create Dramatic Bighorn Sheep Hunt