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How to Cleanly and Properly Field Dress an Animal, Clearly Explained

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This is one of the more clear and detailed video tutorials and explanations on how to properly and cleanly field dress a big game animal.

Mark from Unbroken Outdoors gives one of the clearest and simplest exhibitions of how to field dress an animal that we’ve seen. There are plenty of great videos out there on field dressing big game animals, and this one is well worth adding to that roster.

He takes it slow, explaining each step in the process, with camera work that doesn’t hide anything. He’s working on a wild pig here, but the principles he uses apply to any North American big game animal, be it whitetail deer, sheep, elk or whatever.

Properly field dressing an animal can seem intimidating to some hunters, especially if you’re fairly new to the sport. But it needn’t be. By following these few simple steps and keeping in mind just a few considerations, any hunter can field dress a critter just fine. It’s tough to screw up, and even if you do mess up a little bit, it’s not that big a deal.

Just take your time and be methodical.

Perhaps the number one consideration to bear in mind is to try to avoid nicking or puncturing the intestinal tract. If you can avoid doing that while dressing the beast, you’ll be just fine. But even if you should happen to puncture an intestine and fecal matter spills into the cavity, all is not lost.

Simply and quickly rinse the cavity out with water, and discard any meat that is spoiled from contact with fecal matter. It happens, don’t beat yourself up over it.

By properly field dressing you save yourself a lot of sweat in hauling an animal out of the woods. Make sure you have the right tools with you: game bags, gloves and a sharp knife and a bone saw if necessary.

And save some of those innards, like the heart, to add to your meat cache. I save almost everything: the heart, liver, kidneys, caul fat, and sometimes even the intestines if I intend to make sausage using a natural casing. But to each his own.

Like what you see here? You can read more great articles by David Smith at his facebook page, Stumpjack Outdoors.

NEXT: The Gutless, Bloodless, Quick and Easy Method of Cleaning Grouse

How to Cleanly and Properly Field Dress an Animal, Clearly Explained