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Here’s Another Great Video on How Hunting Benefits Conservation in Africa

Here's Another Video Showing How Hunting Benefits Conservation In Africa

Believe it or not, hunting has many positive impacts on wildlife populations. Don’t believe me? Here’s how hunting benefits conservation in Africa. 

While their decisions were likely well meaning, the United States Fish & Wildlife Service may have sounded the death knell for wildlife populations in Tanzania with their controversial decisions to ban imports of elephant and lion trophies taken by hunters in the East African country.

Watch the video to learn how hunting benefits conservation in Africa.

Have you ever heard the saying “If it pays, it stays”? Well, that’s a 100% true statement, especially in a place like Africa where the locals must live side by side with large, destructive, and dangerous animals. Like the video said, once a safari outfitter leaves an area, it doesn’t take long for the cow and the plow to move in, which is very bad news for wildlife populations.

One of the second-order effects of the USFWS decision to ban elephant and lion imports from Tanzania is that the equivalent of three Kruger Parks worth of African wilderness filled with wildlife may be lost forever as safari operators leave and farmers move in.

Hopefully, the powers that be in the United States government in general and USFWS in particular will realize the error in those decisions and make the necessary changes before it’s too late.

For more information on how hunting promotes wildlife conservation that you use to help educate non-hunters, you can also check out this fantastic video made by College Humor, or this one produced by the German Hunting Association.

Like what you see here? You can read more great hunting articles by John McAdams on his hunting blog. Follow him on Twitter @TheBigGameHunt.

NEXT: YOU NEED TO SHOW YOUR NON-HUNTING FRIENDS THIS VIDEO ON THE BENEFITS OF TROPHY HUNTING IN AFRICA

Here’s Another Great Video on How Hunting Benefits Conservation in Africa