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Expedition into Australian Peninsula Uncovers 13 New Spiders

The Guardian/Jo Harding

A remote area of Australia was hiding 13 new species of spiders.

In the latest trip of the Bush Blitz team to a remote peninsula of northern Australia, volunteers uncovered 13 new species of spiders.

Five times a year, volunteers including teachers, students, and rangers sponsored by the government head out to Australia’s wilderness to document plants and animals.

To date, volunteers have discovered over 700 new species, while studying over 20,000 already known species.

Their trip this time around only lasted 10 days and took them to Queensland’s Cape York Peninsula. It is one of the most remote and unspoiled wilderness areas in the world.

The new species included numerous tarantulas, trap door spiders, and a newly named mouse spider. They will be added to the ever-growing list of 40,000 already known spiders of the world.

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Expedition into Australian Peninsula Uncovers 13 New Spiders