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Ever Seen a Deer with Warts?

fibroma
Idaho Department of Fish and Game

Not too many deer get fibromas, more commonly known as warts.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game says it has received calls from folks who have seen deer in the neighborhood with odd skin growths. White-tailed deer, mule deer and other ungulates can get the skin condition. The deer have dark-colored growths with little hair.

The growths are called fibropapillomas, also known as fibromas, or simply warts. Humans have nothing to worry about: Idaho Fish and Game says that the virus that causes warts in deer are “species specific” to ungulates.

Most of the time, the warts don’t bother the deer, and the growths often disappear over time.

Fish and Game says that a deer could have just one growth or many. Again, as long as the warts don’t get in the way of seeing, walking or eating, they don’t hurt the deer.

The skin condition is thought to be spread through direct contact between deer. However, it is possible that the disease could be transmitted by way of objects with the virus, or by insects. Usually, younger deer have the fibromas. Officials say deer often develop immunity to fibromatosis after having the condition.

Hunters don’t have to be concerned about deer with the growths, either. The fibromas are on the skin, and are not connected to the muscle.

So, the meat is just fine.

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Ever Seen a Deer with Warts?