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An Idiot’s Guide to Treestand Safety

Treestand safety is no laughing matter. Following these simple guidelines could literally save your life.

Every year, hunters die or are seriously injured in treestand accidents. By learning and practicing a few treestand safety guidelines, you’ll stay safe when you’re hunting from on high.

Choose the Right Stand

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Gone are the days when a treestand was a couple of old 2x4s nailed in the crotch of an oak tree. Portable hang on, ladder, and climbing treestands are cheap and easy to install safely. When it comes to steps, hunters can choose from a wide variety of sticks, ladders, or screw in steps. Just be sure to place them close enough together so your not stretching to reach them and use enough steps so you can climb past your stand and step down into it.

Hang It Right

Treestand safety starts before you leave the ground to hang the stand. Using a harness and a lineman’s belt while scaling the tree will help you stay connected if you should slip and fall. After you reach your desired height, attaching a safety line like the Muddy Safeline or the Hunter Safety System Lifeline will keep you protected every time you climb in and out of the stand.

Harness Up

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Wearing a treestand harness is the easiest way to stay safe in the stand. Get a harness that is comfortable and easy to use. That way you won’t have any excuse to leave it in the truck.

Don’t Forget Maintenance

At the end of hunting season, treestands should be taken down and stored out of the weather. This not only prolongs the life of your stand, it also ensures that squirrels don’t chew your straps and cables don’t rust and become brittle. If you do leave your stand up year round, be sure to check all straps and cables before stepping into it.

Although this piece is titled “An Idiot’s Guide to Treestand Safety” the only real idiots are hunters who don’t follow these guidelines.

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An Idiot’s Guide to Treestand Safety